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Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Mary Bull: Birth: 1785. Death: 21 SEP 1840 in prob. Orange Co., NY


Family
Marriage:
Notes
a. Note:   N3977 it doesn’t appear she is related to William Bull line per the Bull book
  “History of Orange County”, by Samuel Eager’s has a sketch on Wiiliam Bull and Sarah Wells would built a house in 1722. “The History and Genealogy of the William Bull and Sarah Wells Family of Orange County, New York”, 1050 pages
  Remove Wm Bull and Sarah Wells for now
  There is a Josiah Bull (1738-1813) livg in Dutchess Co., NY who has a dau Mary the wrong age, but this line seeems more encouraging https://sites.google.com/site/bullfamilypei/generation-reports/bull-lore following was taken f,rom the Hi TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTtory of Orange County by Samuel W. Eager, Esq., and originally published in 1846/1847. The photo is a sketch of the Bull Stone House built about 1722 by William Bull. It was taken from a postcard sketch by Bob Scully. The site is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. If you are interested consider joining the William Bull and Sarah Wells Stone House Association, Inc; 183 County Route 51, Campbell Hall, NY 10916-2924. They have a book on the BULL line, 1050 pages, illustrated, stories, registry report on descendants, cost is approximately $50: "The History and Genealogy of the William Bull and Sarah Wells Family of Orange County, New York."
  Bull Stone House built in 1772 by William Bull William Bull was born at Wolverhampton, England, February, 1689. When he was young, his father left England and The following was taken from the History of Orange County by Samuel W. Eager, Esq., and originally published in 1846/1847. The photo is a sketch of the Bull Stone House built about 1722 by William Bull. It was taken from a postcard sketch by Bob Scully. The site is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. If you are interested consider joining the William Bull and Sarah Wells Stone House Association, Inc; 183 County Route 51, Campbell Hall, NY 10916-2924. They have a book on the BULL line, 1050 pages, illustrated, stories, registry report on descendants, cost is approximately $50: "The History and Genealogy of the William Bull and Sarah Wells Family of Orange County, New York."
  Bull Stone House built in 1772 by William Bull William Bull was born at Wolverhampton, England, February, 1689. When he was young, his father left England and located at Dublin, Ireland, where he was apprenticed to learn the trade of a mason and stone cutter. During his minority we know nothing of him. When his apprenticeship ended, he with a young friend and fellow mason, contracted to build the arch of a large bridge, which was then in progress of erection in the vicinity of the city, and had they succeeded, it might have established their credit as good workmen and talented young men; but just as they were closing the arch and finishing the job, down it tumbled, and with it, the young and bright prospects of the venturesome builders. Bull was overwhelmed by the unexpected calamity, and feeling that future success there was hopeless, he at once determined to emigrate and build his fortune in America, which he had failed thus far to do in Ireland. He mustered and counted up his money, which amounted to five Guineas, went down to the dock, and on board a passenger ship bound soon for New York, and inquired of the officer on board, if five Guineas was sufficient to pay his passage. The reply was in the affirmative and he forthwith completed his arrangements to leave. When the time came, he embarked, having nothing to encumber him but his clothes, five Guineas and a few books. When the ship arrived in port, Bull presented himself to the captain to pay his five Guineas and go ashore; but was told that it was not enough, and being informed it was all he had, replied that he must then be sold for the balance. Bull was very much incensed at the trick put on him by false information in Ireland, and at the indignity so coolly about to be inflicted upon him here, promptly told the officer that he would not be sold, that he would abide by the ship and return to Ireland, and that if he had to be a servant it should be there and not in a strange land. Misfortune had compelled him to leave his country, and now when about to realize his cherished hopes and anxious expectations, it was threatening to drive him back again, and he was in great doubt what course to adopt. But in this case his necessity was God's opportunity, who having mercifully held the winds in his hand during the voyage, now kindly interposed and sent unexpected relief in the person of a stranger. Just at this time Daniel Cromline, who had an interest in the Wawayanda Patent, and was about to make a settlement thereon, finding an Irish passenger ship in port and thinking that he might procure some laborers and artisans there, went on board and made his wants known to the captain. Proclamation was made throughout the ship, that there was a gentleman on board who wanted to employ some workmen and mechanics to settle a new country, and if there were any on board who were willing to engage, to come forward. The proclamation fell upon Bull like a message from heaven, and he felt that he was at least cared for by God and strangers, and his heart was instantly filled with gratitude and hopes revived. He spoke and said that he was an artisan and laborer and had left Ireland for America thinking he had money to pay his passage, but that falling short and for the deficiency was about to be sold, which he had refused to be, he thought of returning, but if any gentleman would advance the money, he would undertake, should his health and life to spared, he should have no cause to regret the kindness. Cromline, pleased with his appearance, prompt and manly bearing, advanced the money and they left the ship together. Bull, in company with other workmen, soon went with Cromline upon the patent, to prepare to erect a dwelling and make a settlement. Bull executed the mason and others did the carpenter work, and he cut the year of erection, 1716, in the stones of the chimney. The boards of the house were sawed by a whip in a sawpit, and the whole wood work fastened by wood pins in place of nails. This at the time, and for years afterwards, was the largest and best house from New Windsor to New Jersey. This house was known as the old Graycourt house and was about five miles southeast from the log mansion of Christopher Denn, in Hamptonburgh. The structure stood for over 116 years--longer than any other except the Bull stone house at Hamptonburgh. The population was very sparse in that part of the county and all living within a dozen miles of each other were near neighbors and kept up an intimate and friendly intercourse. As Christopher Denn was a patentee and Daniel Cromline interested in the patent, both having made settlements and living within six miles of each other, it was natural and expected that these families would often meet on the most friendly terms. Thus William Bull, who continued to live at the Cromline house, became acquainted with Sarah Wells, which ripened into love and eventuated in matrimony in the year 1718. Sarah Wells was an orphan maid who was adopted by the childless couple, Mr. and Madam Denn. Though light and fragile, Sarah was active and capable of remarkable exercise and endurance. This, in part, may have resulted from the fact, that while young she had been in the habit of crossing the ferry in an open boat from Staten Island to New York, attending to the market business of her patrons. This exposure, while it imparted health by the exercise, not only hardened and compacted a constitution otherwise delicate, but deepened the color of her sanguine complexion. Her eyes were neither large nor prominent, but dark, playful and sparkling. Though not a flippant talker, she was free and conversable; and when excited to reply to some rude remark or impertinent inquiry, her eyes would flash like fire, and the presumptuous intruder was sure to be wounded in the conflict. and carry the scar home with him for reflection. Christopher Denn, to develop his patent on land, sent sixteen year old Sarah along with some Indians whom he considered somewhat trustworthy to the area "to settle a patent of unknown wilderness twenty miles square, infested by serpents, tenanted by savages of unknown fidelity, and roamed over by beasts of prey, by the instrumentality and personal daring of this little girl." Sarah was to superintend and conduct the household affairs till he and Madam Denn should go. That accommodations should be ready for their arrival, he intended to send up at the same time some carpenters to put up a temporary wigwam, to serve them, till they could erect a more durable log cabin. The white men would be a guard for Sarah, ensure her safety and greatly relieve her from the very imprudent and hazardous condition in which he was about to place her. Sarah completed her tasks competently and took care of all necessary business until the arrival of the Denns. For a more complete account of her experiences, see "Account of William Bull and Sarah Wells" reprinted from the History of Orange County by Samuel W. Eager, Esq., available at the Bull Stone House, Hamptonburgh, New York. Contact: William Bull and Sarah Wells; Stone House Association, Inc.; 183 County Route 51, Campbell Hall, NY 10916-2924. Christopher Denn had promised Sarah 100 acres of land for commencing the settlement of the patent, and Sarah, upon impending marriage to William Bull, now requested a fulfillment of the promise. Denn advised her not to be in a hurry to marry a young Irishman who might play her some trick, and finally leave her. At this she became offended and she replied that Bull was born in England , and though brought up in Ireland, she did not know that that made him an Irishman; and that he was as good an Englishman as Denn himself. They secured this land and William also secured an additional 100 acres that he could call his own. When he erected is log cabin in 1719 or 20 hhttps://sites.google.com/site/bullfamilypei/generation-reports/bull-lorehttps://sites.google.com/site/bullfamilypei/generation-reports/bull-loree called the place Hamptonburgh in honor of Wolverhampton, the place of his birth. William Bull died February, 1755, aged 66. Sarah Wells, his wife, was born April 6, 1694 and died April 21, 1796, aged 102 years and 15 days. They were buried in the family yard at Hamptonburgh, in the grounds he gave for the purpose, and known as "Burying Hill." A large quantity of the land owned by this early settler is still in the possession of his descendants.  located at Dublin, Ireland, where he was apprenticed to learn the trade of a mason and stone cutter. During his minority we know nothing of him. When his apprenticeship ended, he with a young friend and fellow mason, c
  ontracted to build the arch of a large bridge, which was then in progress of erection in the vicinity of the city, and had they succeeded, it might have established their credit as good workmen and talented young men; but just as they were closing the arch and finishing the job, down it tumbled, and with it, the young and bright prospects of the venturesome builders. Bull was overwhelmed by the unexpected calamity, and feeling that future success there was hopeless, he at once determined to emigrate and build his fortune in America, which he had failed thus far to do in Ireland. He mustered and counted up his money, which amounted to five Guineas, went down to the dock, and on board a passenger ship bound soon for New York, and inquired of the officer on board, if five Guineas was sufficient to pay his passage. The reply was in the affirmative and he forthwith completed his arrangements to leave. When the time came, he embarked, having nothing to encumber him but his clothes, five Guineas and a few books. When the ship arrived in port, Bull presented himself to the captain to pay his five Guineas and go ashore; but was told that it was not enough, and being informed it was all he had, replied that he must then be sold for the balance. Bull was very much incensed at the trick put on him by false information in Ireland, and at the indignity so coolly about to be inflicted upon him here, promptly told the officer that he would not be sold, that he would abide by the ship and return to Ireland, and that if he had to be a servant it should be there and not in a strange land. Misfortune had compelled him to leave his country, and now when about to realize his cherished hopes and anxious expectations, it was threatening to drive him back again, and he was in great doubt what course to adopt. But in this case his necessity was God's opportunity, who having mercifully held the winds in his hand during the voyage, now kindly interposed and sent unexpected relief in the person of a stranger. Just at this time Daniel Cromline, who had an interest in the Wawayanda Patent, and was about to make a settlement thereon, finding an Irish passenger ship in port and thinking that he might procure some laborers and artisans there, went on board and made his wants known to the captain. Proclamation was made throughout the ship, that there was a gentleman on board who wanted to employ some workmen and mechanics to settle a new country, and if there were any on board who were willing to engage, to come forward. The proclamation fell upon Bull like a message from heaven, and he felt that he was at least cared for by God and strangers, and his heart was instantly filled with gratitude and hopes revived. He spoke and said that he was an artisan and laborer and had left Ireland for America thinking he had money to pay his passage, but that falling short and for the deficiency was about to be sold, which he had refused to be, he thought of returning, but if any gentleman would advance the money, he would undertake, should his health and life to spared, he should have no cause to regret the kindness. Cromline, pleased with his appearance, prompt and manly bearing, advanced the money and they left the ship together. Bull, in company with other workmen, soon went with Cromline upon the patent, to prepare to erect a dwelling and make a settlement. Bull executed the mason and others did the carpenter work, and he cut the year of erection, 1716, in the stones of the chimney. The boards of the house were sawed by a whip in a sawpit, and the whole wood work fastened by wood pins in place of nails. This at the time, and for years afterwards, was the largest and best house from New Windsor to New Jersey. This house was known as the old Graycourt house and was about five miles southeast from the log mansion of Christopher Denn, in Hamptonburgh. The structure stood for over 116 years--longer than any other except the Bull stone house at Hamptonburgh. The population was very sparse in that part of the county and all living within a dozen miles of each other were near neighbors and kept up an intimate and friendly intercourse. As Christopher Denn was a patentee and Daniel Cromline interested in the patent, both having made settlements and living within six miles of each other, it was natural and expected that these families would often meet on the most friendly terms. Thus William Bull, who continued to live at the Cromline house, became acquainted with Sarah Wells, which ripened into love and eventuated in matrimony in the year 1718. Sarah Wells was an orphan maid who was adopted by the childless couple, Mr. and Madam Denn. Though light and fragile, Sarah was active and capable of remarkable exercise and endurance. This, in part, may have resulted from the fact, that while young she had been in the habit of crossing the ferry in an open boat from Staten Island to New York, attending to the market business of her patrons. This exposure, while it imparted health by the exercise, not only hardened and compacted a constitution otherwise delicate, but deepened the color of her sanguine complexion. Her eyes were neither large nor prominent, but dark, playful and sparkling. Though not a flippant talker, she was free and conversable; and when excited to reply to some rude remark or impertinent inquiry, her eyes would flash like fire, and the presumptuous intruder was sure to be wounded in the conflict. and carry the scar home with him for reflection. Christopher Denn, to develop his patent on land, sent sixteen year old Sarah along with some Indians whom he considered somewhat trustworthy to the area "to settle a patent of unknown wilderness twenty miles square, infested by serpents, tenanted by savages of unknown fidelity, and roamed over by beasts of prey, by the instrumentality and personal daring of this little girl." Sarah was to superintend and conduct the household affairs till he and Madam Denn should go. That accommodations should be ready for their arrival, he intended to send up at the same time some carpenters to put up a temporary wigwam, to serve them, till they could erect a more durable log cabin. The white men would be a guard for Sarah, ensure her safety and greatly relieve her from the very imprudent and hazardous condition in which he was about to place her. Sarah completed her tasks competently and took care of all necessary business until the arrival of the Denns. For a more complete account of her experiences, see "Account of William Bull and Sarah Wells" reprinted from the History of Orange County by Samuel W. Eager, Esq., available at the Bull Stone House, Hamptonburgh, New York. Contact: William Bull and Sarah Wells; Stone House Association, Inc.; 183 County Route 51, Campbell Hall, NY 10916-2924. Christopher Denn had promised Sarah 100 acres of land for commencing the settlement of the patent, and Sarah, upon impending marriage to William Bull, now requested a fulfillment of the promise. Denn advised her not to be in a hurry to marry a young Irishman who might play her some trick, and finally leave her. At this she became offended and she replied that Bull was born in England , and though brought up in Ireland, she did not know that that made him an Irishman; and that he was as good an Englishman as Denn himself. They secured this land and William also secured an additional 100 acres that he could call his own. When he erected is log cabin in 1719 or 20 he called the place Hamptonburgh in honor of Wolverhampton, the place of his birth. William Bull died February, 1755, aged 66. Sarah Wells, his wife, was born April 6, 1694 and died April 21, 1796, aged 102 years and 15 days. They were buried in the family yard at Hamptonburgh, in the grounds he gave for the purpose, and known as "Burying Hill." A large quantity of the land owned by this early settler is still in the possession of his descendants.


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